Two Offa’s Dyke Path benches

Published 28 April 2024

An elaborately carved bench.
Bench.

I like a bench. They’re handy to sit on. Especially when the ground is muddy. Or where there’s simply no sensible place to sit.

Benches can sometimes be utilitarian. But not this bench, on Rushock Hill, on the Offa’s Dyke Path between Kington and Knighton. It’s rather elaborate. A piece of art in itself. And it has an inscription:

Look deep into nature and you will understand everything better

Does looking deep into nature make you understand everything better? Pass. But it is a nice bench.

Here’s another bench, not far from Buttington near Welshpool. At least, I think it’s supposed to be a bench…

An old style fashioned into a bench.
A bench?

It looks like it was once a stile. Or a fence. Or something. But now it looks to be a bench.

It’s also a piece of art, although perhaps not quite in the same way as its companion.

This bench also has an inscription.

Carved in some wood: There was a crooked man
who walked a crooked mile
he found a crooked sixpence
upon a cooked stile
A crooked stile. Bench. Thing.

There was a crooked man
who walked a crooked mile
he found a crooked sixpence
upon a cooked stile

That bench, I am sure, has wiser words than most.

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